3 trunks

This scene is on  a part of the Heysen Trail in Waitpinga. I often walk along this section on a poodlewalk  as it is a strip of bush between farmland. 

I thought that working on this tree project that was working towards a photobook  was a waste of time. Then I came across the Melbourne Photobook collective  and William Stewart's On the Making of Trees-- which is an article about the process of making a photobook based on him  photographing trees over a number of  years.  

tree, Waitpinga

This is another  local tree. It is  on the roadside of a country road in Waitpinga, South Australia that I often walk down.   

The  picture was made in 2016 whilst I was on an early  morning  poodlewalk.

I discovered last night that Sophie Cunningham  has a tree of the day Instagram account.  Mary Macpherson   has a book of trees in New Zealand called Bent.  I am sure that there are other photographers photographing tree apart from Beth Moon.   

4 trees on Baum Rd

This blog has transformed into a photoblog  about trees including what happens to trees once they have been cut down.   

These photographs are not of  trees in the wilderness.  I live in a place where there are trees,  and I  frequently  photograph them a lot whilst I am on my poodle walks.  This  photographing of  trees  then extends  to  my road trips.  These are mostly trees in agricultural landscapes.  

A picture of four trees on local  country road--Baum Rd-- which were  photographed on a  late afternoon walk on an overcast day. The  rain was coming in from the south-west. 

Robin Boyd, a critic of suburban sprawl, coined the term "arboraphobia," or white Australia's fear of trees, that led to massive razing of land to create a paved suburban landscape.  A suburbia  that is a wasteland,  a dry, ugly cement landscape of the suburbs; mangy backyards with pathetic garden plots and dark, claustrophobic interiors with cracked walls and ceilings and, ironically, floral carpets. These images are linked to moral aridity, sexual dysfunction, the sterile suffocation of suburban living, and the dread of natural growth invading the house.